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Aromatics and the Soul. A Study of Smells by Dan McKenzie

By Dan McKenzie

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But that and other even more objectionable habits do not prevent his entrée into the most exclusive circles of human society. He is taken at his own valuation, and that, to be sure, is considerable. But the minute, the meticulous, olfactory scrutiny he makes of other dogs is but one more example of the predominance of this sense in his brain. ) When you take him for a walk also, how busy his nose makes him ! —is not this a richer, a fuller, a more attractive, world than ours, with its fickle sunlight, its pallid greys, its mournful 36 Aromatics and the Soul purples, its unattainable horizon-blue ?

Perhaps the herb everlasting, the fragrant immortelle of our autumn fields, has the most suggestive odour to me of all those that set me dreaming. I can hardly describe the strange thoughts and emotions that come to me as I inhale the aroma of the pale, dry, rustling flowers. A something it has of sepulchral spicery, as if it had been brought from the core of some great pyramid, where it had lain on the breast of a mummied Pharaoh. Something, too, of immortality in the sad, faint sweetness fingering so long in its lifeless petals.

Douglas Gordon (Spectator, August 6th, 1921) : " The real damage wrought by the badger is microscopic. His diet mainly consists of roots, green herbs, mice, frogs, and insects. Like the fox, he has a great partiality for whorts and blackberries when in season, and he is particularly fond of grubs. For the sake of these he will dig out every wasp's nest he can find. A considerable number of rabbit ' stops ' also fall to his share, and in unearthing the latter he practises a somewhat remarkable piece of woodcraft.

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