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Arms and Armour in Antiquity and the Middle Ages by Paul Lacombe, Charles Boutell

By Paul Lacombe, Charles Boutell

Various illustrations, many from assets now misplaced, again up a close dialogue of world-wide advancements in armor from the earliest occasions, and guns from the Stone Age to early firearms and cannon.

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Medusa Shield: A Work of the 16th Centry, in the Royal Armoury, Madrid 264 Fig. Persiam Shield. In the Imperial Russian Museum 264 Fig. Enriched Shafted Weapons. In Rile Artillery Museum, Paris 265 Fig. The Mascaron Swork. Royal Armoury, Madrid 266 Fig. D. 1453-1515. Royal Armoury, Madrid 267 Fig. Moorish Adargue: 15th Century 267 Page x Page Fig. Italian Helm of the 16th Century 268 Fig. Italian Shield of the 16th Century. Both in the Artilllery Museum, Paris 268 Fig. Group of Four Helms in the Russian Imperial Museum 269 Fig.

Page List of Plates ix List of Illustrations xi Publishers' Note xvi Preface xxii Chapter I. The Weapons of the Stone Age 1 Chapter II. Arms and Armour of the Assyrians 10 Section IIArms and Armour of the Gauls 14 Section IIIArms and Armour of the Greeks of the Heroic Ages 20 Chapter III. Arms and Armour of the Etruscans 53 Chapter IV. Offensive Weapons 62 Chapter V. The Decoration of Ancient Arms and Armour 76 Page vi Chapter VI. D. D. 768814 94 Chapter VII. Arms and Armour of the Middle Ages.

Thus, when they invaded Gaul, the Romans always wore defensive armour formed of iron, and all their offensive weapons were made of the same metal; but, at the same period, the arms of the Gauls were constructed of both bronze and iron, and both metals were evidently held in high esteem. 5 In this chapter we propose to treat of the weapons, and also of the defensive equipment of the Assyrians, of the Gauls, and of the Greeks at the time of the Trojan war. Our silence concerning the arms and armour of other contemporary nations must be attributed to its true causethe absence of historical monuments.

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