Chemistry

Acid-Base Cements: Their Biomedical and Industrial by Alan D. Wilson;John W. Nicholson

By Alan D. Wilson;John W. Nicholson

There was a failure to acknowledge acid-base cements as a unmarried, well-defined classification of fabric. This e-book makes an attempt to treatment this example by way of unifying the topic and treating this diversity of fabrics as a unmarried type. Following a quick ancient evaluation, an introductory bankruptcy defines those cements as fabrics which are shaped by means of reacting a simple powder with an acidic liquid to yield a salt-like matrix. the character of the cementation method and the cement-forming acids and bases are mentioned. different chapters are dedicated to the equipment of research, the constitution of water and straightforward polyelectrolyte conception.

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Extra resources for Acid-Base Cements: Their Biomedical and Industrial Applications (Chemistry of Solid State Materials)

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These substances were called alkalis, a name which comes from the Arabic for plant ash, al halja (Finston & Rychtman, 1982) or algali. The term alkali applies only to the hydroxides and carbonates of sodium and potassium, and it was Rouelle in 1744 who extended the concept to include the alkaline earth analogues and used the term base to categorize them (Walden, 1929; Day & Selbin, 1969). Salt formation as a criterion for an acid-base interaction has a long history (Walden, 1929). Rudolph Glauber in 1648 stated that acids and alkalis were opposed to each other and that salts were composed of these two components.

1922). A general conception of acids, bases and salts. Science, 56, 27 (Lecture abstract). Cady, H. P. & Elsey, H. M. (1928). A general definition of acids, bases and salts. Journal of Chemical Education, 5, 1425-8. 26 References Cartledge, G. H. (1928a). Studies on the periodic system. I. The ionic potential as a periodic function. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 50, 2855-63. Cartledge, G. H. (1928b). Studies on the periodic system. II. The ionic potential and related properties. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 50, 2863-72.

Inspection of this table throws some light on the requirements for cement formation. If judged by strength and hydrolytic stability of cements formed with orthophosphoric acid, poly(acrylic acid) and poly(vinylphosphonic acid), the common cement-forming cations can be ranked in the following order of decreasing effectiveness. Al3+> Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Mg2+ > Ca2+ The first three form amphoteric oxides and are distinctly superior, as cement-formers, to the latter two which form weakly basic oxides. 3b indicate that optimum cement formation occurs with cations that have In values lying between 18 and 29.

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