Metaphysics

Abstract Entities by Roger Teichmann (auth.)

By Roger Teichmann (auth.)

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Thus, both sides may go in for 'stonewalling'. The realist may assert that it is simply the fact that all colours are colours which explains why they form a kind, what they have in common being simply self-evident; while the nominalist may say (for example) that 'A Abstract Terms 39 is red, so, and in virtue of this, A is coloured' is a truth in which the role of the phrase 'in virtue of this' is simply self-evident. According to the latter view, it will be sufficient to paraphrase 'Redness is a colour' as: 'Necessarily, if anything is red, it is (in virtue of this) coloured'.

Amongst properties, for instance, there are colours, shapes, sizes, weights, and so forth. Are these not just kinds of property? , form sub-kinds, or of saying that 'property' is a formal concept-word (or something along those lines), and that our family is simply a list of kinds. In any case, a sentence such as 'Redness is a colour' appears to say something about what property-kind redness belongs to - a kind also including whiteness, greenness, and so on - and if this appearance is not deceptive, surely we can neither call 'is a colour' a contextually eli minable verb, nor deny that 'redness' is a name after all?

For instance, we may well want to infer that John and Arthur have something in common from the truth of 'David thinks John an idiot, and thinks Arthur an idiot also': John and Arthur are both thought by David to be an idiot. The sentential operator 'David thinks that' modifies 'is an idiot' to produce the complex predicable 'David thinks that-is an idiot', which allows the existential generalisation, '(3F)(Fj & Fa)'. 32 The General Problem and its Solution I have paid this much attention to adverbs partly because we shall have more to do with them in Part II (chapter 4).

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