Metaphysics

A Critical Introduction to the Metaphysics of Time by Benjamin L. Curtis, Jon Robson

By Benjamin L. Curtis, Jon Robson

What is the character of time? Does it stream? Do the previous and destiny exist? Drawing connections among ancient and present-day questions, A severe creation to the Metaphysics of Time presents an up to date advisor to at least one of the main crucial and debated issues in modern metaphysics.

Introducing the perspectives and arguments of Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Newton and Leibniz, this obtainable creation covers the background of the philosophy of time from the Pre-Socratics to the start of the twentieth Century. The historic survey offers the mandatory history to knowing newer advancements, together with McTaggart's 1908 argument for the unreality of time, the open destiny, the perdurance/endurance debate, the potential for time shuttle, and the relevance of present physics to the philosophy of time.

Informed by means of state-of-the-art philosophical examine, A severe advent to the Metaphysics of Time evaluates influential old arguments within the context of up to date advancements. for college students trying to achieve insights into how principles in the philosophy of time have built and higher comprehend contemporary arguments, this is often the suitable beginning point.

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Extra resources for A Critical Introduction to the Metaphysics of Time

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We 40 A CRITICAL INTRODUCTION TO THE METAPHYSICS OF TIME finished with a brief look at Kant’s view of space and time. In the next chapter we leave the history of the philosophy of time behind, and begin explicitly to consider issues that continue to exercise contemporary philosophers working on the metaphysics of time. Our starting point is a famous argument, put forward in 1908 by J. M. E. McTaggart, that has as its conclusion that time is unreal. The issues that McTaggart’s argument gives rise to will then be our major concern in Chapters 4 to 9.

Or are they smaller atom-like things? In fact, Descartes is unclear on this point. g. Cottingham 1986: 84–5), most interpret him as holding that parts of the universe are also material substances in their own right. The following extract from a letter written by Descartes to the theologian Father Gibeuf in 1642 strongly supports this interpretation: From the simple fact that I consider two halves of a part of matter, however small it may be, as two complete substances … I conclude with certainty that they are really divisible.

We can only guess precisely how Leibniz would have applied this account to Newton’s Bucket (for Leibniz died shortly after raising this suggestion and so never developed it further), but the following is a reasonable suggestion: in Newton’s Bucket the water obtains its motion from the bucket which is spinning about it, which obtains its motion from the rope that is uncurling above it, which obtains its motion from the person who wound it up, and so on, until we end up at a body which obtains its motion from a force contained within itself.

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